Dark Purple Gradient Button with Blinking Outline

Click Here

CasesIndian Cases

A.S. Sulochana vs C. Dharmalingam on 28 November, 1986

Supreme Court of India

A.S. Sulochana vs C. Dharmalingam on 28 November, 1986

Equivalent citations: 1987 AIR 242, 1987 SCR (1) 379

Author: M Thakkar

Bench: Thakkar, M.P. (J)

           PETITIONER:
A.S. SULOCHANA

	Vs.

RESPONDENT:
C. DHARMALINGAM

DATE OF JUDGMENT28/11/1986

BENCH:
THAKKAR, M.P. (J)
BENCH:
THAKKAR, M.P. (J)
RAY, B.C. (J)

CITATION:
 1987 AIR  242		  1987 SCR  (1) 379
 1987 SCC  (1) 180	  JT 1986  1068
 1986 SCALE  (2)996


ACT:
    Tamilnadu  Buildings (Lease and Rent Control) Act  1960,
s.10(2)(ii)(a)-Eviction	 on the ground of  unlawful  sublet-
ting--Such  sub-letting must be by the tenant sought  to  be
evicted and not by his predecessor.



HEADNOTE:
    The	 appellant-landlord instituted an eviction  suit  in
1970 against the respondent-tenant on the ground of unlawful
subletting.  The respondent had inherited the  tenancy	upon
the death of his father in 1968. The subletting was created,
in  1952 during the life time of appellants father.  Neither
the appellant, nor the respondent had any personal knowledge
about  the  terms  and conditions of  the  lease  originally
granted	 by  the father of the appellant in  favour  of	 the
father of the respondent.
    The	 High  Court,  while dismissing the  appeal  of	 the
appellant-landlord, held that a tenant sought to be  evicted
on the ground of unlawful subletting under s.10(2)(ii)(a) of
the Tamil Nadu Buildings (Lease and Rent control) Act,	1960
must himself have been guilty of the contravention and	that
the alleged contravention by his father when he was a tenant
can be of no avail for evicting the tenant.
Dismissing the Appeal of the appellant-landlord, this Court,
    HELD:  1(i)	 Section  10(2) of the Act  opens  with	 the
words,	"a landlord who seeks to evict his tenant" and	pro-
vides  that if the tenant has created a	 subtenancy  without
the written consent of the landlord, he will he liable to be
evicted.  When the statute says the tenant who is sought  to
he  evicted must he guilty of the contravention,  the  Court
cannot	say,  "guilt of his predecessor	 in  interest"	will
suffice. [382C-D]
    (ii)  The  flouting of the law, the sin under  the	Rent
Act, must he the sin of the tenant sought to be evicted	 and
not that of his father or predecessor in interest. It  being
a  penal provision in the sense that it visits the  violator
with  the punishment of eviction, it must he  strictly	con-
strued, for it causes less misery to be sheltered in a jail,
than to be shelterless without. [382E]
In the instant case, there is nothing on record to show that
the subletting
380
which  was made in 1952,18 years before the  institution  of
the eviction suit in 1970, was in violation of the  relevant
provisions  of law. There is no evidence, direct or  circum-
stantial,  on  the basis of which it can be  said  that	 the
lease  did  not confer on the father of the  respondent	 the
right  to create a sub-tenancy, or that it was done  without
the written consent of the then landlord, the father of	 the
appellant.  Under these circumstances, the appellant  cannot
successfully  evict the respondent on the ground  of  having
created	 an  unlawful  sub-tenancy  within  the	 meaning  of
S.10(2)(ii)(a) of the Act. [381G, 382A-B]



JUDGMENT:

CIVIL APPELLATE JURISDICTION: Civil Appeal No. 1124 of 1973. From the Judgment and Order dated 29.11.1972 of the Madras High Court in C.R.P. No. 1066 of 1972. K. Ramkumar for the Appellant.

The Judgment of the Court was delivered by THAKKAR, J. The view taken by the High Court that a tenant sought to be evicted on the ground of unlawful sub- letting under Section 10(2)(ii)(a)1 of the Tamil Nadu Build- ings (Lease and Rent Control) Act, 1960 must himself have been guilty of the contravention and that the alleged con- travention by his father when he was a tenant can be of no avail for evicting him is assailed in this appeal by special leave. The High Court has so pronounced in the backdrop of the admitted fact that respondent had himself not created any sub-tenancy after he became the tenant in 1968 upon the death of his father. The plea raised by the appellant that the tenancy created in 1952 by the father of respondent rendered him liable to be evicted in the suit instituted by the appellant in 1970 was repelled. The unsuccessful land- lord has now invoked this Court’s jurisdiction under Article 136 of the Constitution of India.

Facts not in dispute are:–

1. The father of the appellant had granted a lease in favour of the

1. “10(2) ” A landlord who seeks to evict his tenant shall apply to the Controller for a direction in that behalf. If the Controller, after giving the tenant a reasonable oppor- tunity of showing cause against the application, is satis- fied-

(i) xxx xxxx

(ii) that the tenant has after the 23rd Octo- ber, 1945 without the written consent of the landlord–

(a) transferred his right under the lease or sub-let the entire building or any portion thereof, if the lease does not confer on him any right to do so, or X X X X XXXXX”

father of respondent prior to 1952 (the exact date or year is not on record).

2. The father of the appellant as also the father of respondent both have died.

3. Respondent was accepted as a tenant upon the death of his father in 1968.

4. The suit for eviction giving rise to the present appeal was instituted for eviction on the ground of unlawful subletting in 1970 by the appellant who had inherited the property from her father.

5. Admittedly, neither the appellant nor the respondent have any personal knowledge about the terms and conditions of the lease originally granted by the father of the appel- lant in favour of the father of respondent no.

1.

6. So also neither the appellant nor the respondent have any personal knowledge in what circumstance the father of the respondent had created a sub-tenancy in favour of Kuppuswami Sah way back in 1952, eighteen years before the institution of the suit.

7. Neither the appellant nor re- spondent has any personal knowledge as to whether or not the sub-tenancy was created with the written consent of the landlord eighteen years back in 1952.

And on these facts the prayer for eviction must be denied regardless of the question of interpretation which will be presently tackled. The mere fact that for as many as 18 years no objection was raised, and no action for possession was instituted against the father of the appellant in his lifetime notwithstanding the fact that a sub-tenant was openly in occupation of a part of the rented premises, would give rise to an inference that it was never treated as unlawful sub-letting by the appellant or her father. There is nothing on record to show that the subletting in ques- tion, which was made in 1952, 18 years before the institu- tion of the suit in 1970, was in violation of the relevant provisions of law. The appellant cannot succeed unless the appellant establishes that Section 10(2)(ii)(a) has been violated and the tenant has incurred the liability to be evicted on the ground of unlawful sub-letting notwithstand- ing the fact that the lease did not confer on him any such right, and that such unlawful sub-tenancy was created with- out the written consent of the then landlord. There is no evidence, direct or circumstantial, on the basis of which it can be said that the lease did not confer on the father of the respondent the right to create a sub-tenancy. Or that it was done without the written consent of the then landlord, that is to say, the father of the appellant. Under the circum- stances, in any view of the matter the appellant cannot successfully evict the respondent on the ground of having created an unlawful sub-tenancy within the meaning of Sec- tion 10(2)(ii)(a) of the Act.

Examining the profile of the view taken by the High Court that the offending sub-letting must be by the tenant sought to be evicted himself, and not by his predecessor, it appears to be blemishless. Section 10(2) opens with the words “A landlord who seeks to evict his tenant” and pro- vides that if the tenant has created a sub-tenancy without the written consent of the landlord, he will be liable to be evicted. Pray who is the ‘tenant’ whom the landlord wants to evict? That tenant is the respondent. Did he violate Section 10(2)(ii)(a) and sub,let the rented premises? The answer is ‘no’. It is of little use to give the answer, not he, but his predecessor, his late father, had sub-let the premises. When the statute says the tenant who is sought to be evicted must be guilty of the contravention, the Court cannot say, ‘guilt of his predecessor in interest’ will suffice. The flouting of the law, the sin under the Rent Act must be the sin of the tenant sought to be evicted, and not that of his father or predecessor in interest. Respondent inherited the tenancy, not the sin, if any, of his father. The law in its wisdom seeks to punish the guilty who commits the sin, and not his son who is innocent of the rent law offence. It being a penal provision in the sense that it visits the violator with the punishment of eviction, it must be strict- ly construed, for it causes less misery to be sheltered in a jail, than to be shelterless without. Be that as it may the conclusion recorded by the High Court is fault-free. We, therefore, see no reason to interfere with the order of the High Court in exercise of our jurisdiction under Article 136 of the Constitution of India. The appeal accord- ingly fails and is dismissed. There will be no order as to costs.

M.L.A.       Appeal

dismissed,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button